Posts Tagged ‘climbers’

Clematis ‘Wisley Cream’

January 19, 2014

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A plant I mentioned in my January newsletter – currently in flower in my garden. The parent plant – Clematis cirrhosa – is from the Balearics but is perfectly hardy in the UK. A harsh winter might cut it back, but it would recover. There are several other varieties, such as the ever-popular ‘Freckles’, with maroon-speckled flowers – but I prefer the plain cream one that I grow.

Clematis are supposed to be good bee plants, though I have not noticed any, or indeed any other pollinating insects. Possibly an extended mild period is necessary before they become active. Unlike the later, more flamboyant clematis, this is a plant of subtle, subdued charm. Any necessary pruning can be done in spring, just after flowering.

Rosa ‘Wedding Day’

June 25, 2010

The joy of climbers is that they present their flowers at, or just above, eye level, allowing you to inspect individuals, then inviting you to turn your gaze skywards – always a hopeful gesture. I have just been admiring the velvety pink flowers of the clematis ‘Mme Julia Correvon’ (see the entry for 31 July 2009) then, a little further on, noticed that those of the vigorous rambler ‘Wedding Day’ are just beginning to open.

Wedding Day is a vigorous rambler, covered in clusters of single white flowers in early summer

There’s a host of roughly similar ramblers that produce great clusters of single white flowers – ‘Bobbie James’, ‘Seagull’, ‘Rambling Rector’ (actually, I think two out of these may actually be one and the same thing) – but what distinguishes ‘Wedding Day’ is the buds, which are a delectable creamy yellow.

Mine is now covering one side of my old apple tree (which manages to fruit regardless of the competition). Some of the flowers are already fully open, but its peak is yet to come. Even so, the flowering is brief – but spectacular.